Spring gardening

March 23: first day of garden clean-up (dug up clumps of weeds), followed by garden planning by the warm fire glow. Definitely need more flowers and favorite edibles, and time to repaint the garden fencing. March 24: sown kale, leafy greens (frost tolerant), spinach and sugar snap peas. April 5: spotted garlic peeking that I planted in the fall, as well as early spring risers (irises, tulips, alliums, hyacinths). Started indoor garden with a lot of hope: San Marzano and Chadwick Cherry tomatoes, zucchini, English cucumber, pickling cucumber, rosemary, morning glory, zinnias, cosmos and foxgloves. April 7: sweet pea plantings in 10 spots in my front and back gardens. April 10: researched deer and wind resistant perennials for my new “Lavender Hill.” (Just two lavenders on my hill thus far.) Created a list of flowers to look for at one of my favorite flower hoop houses: Hilltop Greenhouse & Farms of west-side Ann Arbor.

Pretty skunk cabbage

I have developed the habit of hiking along the Lowland trail in Waterloo State Park in early spring. So convenient to my home, the trail always delivers on the first distinct signs of spring with the rising of hardy gold-speckled burgundy claws in the wetlands. Oftentimes, I see this skunk cabbage peaking through early-spring snow. A big thanks to the skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus) for the reassurance that spring has truly arrived. Soon, the forest bed will be sprinkled with dainty Trilliums and the outstretched green foliage of the skunk cabbage will be overlooked. Not its smell, though! It is a stinker once its leaves unfurl. Even so, I’m a fan because its a harbinger of spring in the woods and the stinky fragrance attracts certain insect pollinators. Learn more here.

Hello, Spring!

signs of spring: allium

No signs of snow here. It’s spring  and International Day of Happiness. It’s easy to be happy on the first official day of spring. (Big cozy hugs to those still in the snow.) For me, with the official spring calendar day, I cheerfully say, “Adios, winter!”

The streams are bubbling — bubbles sighted! — along the trail. The brave spring flora are emerging.

A harbinger of spring, my garden alliums have been a longtime favorite; their statuesque beauty always ignites joy. I was so worried their relocation last fall to another garden bed would disrupt their cycle. Worries, begone.  Bring on the happy!