Bouquets to go

What a busy month it has been! * Planting seeds (yes — sowing through June), digging up new beds for many cuttings/divides from friends and families, including perennial Forget-Me-Nots, Irises, anemones, Feverfew, peonies, mystery flowers (hmmm?), phlox and more. * Launching a new business with deliveries for grad parties and weekly to Agricole Farm Stop on Tuesdays. * Organizing my work station for creating bouquets and settling into a routine for weeding, planning and marketing. This week, I’ll finally design and order business cards, so I can start handing them out when people ask for them. Simple, yet essential!

There is so much joy in the act of digging in the dirt, sowing seeds and watching the efforts bloom. I have a vision for more raised beds and a beautiful hillside garden for more flowers in 2020. Meanwhile, I am savoring harvests to create wild beauty bouquets with my garden flowers and flora foraged from my meadow.

Garden bouquets for sale

Busy, busy! Springtime is filled with labor-intensive days prepping garden beds for annuals, new perennials and veggies — and launching my new seasonal flower bouquet business, Cheerful Nature Bouquets.

I am thrilled with the prospect of a flourishing late summer-fall garden of zinnias, cosmos, calendulas, amaranth, tomatoes, cucumbers, beets, basil and carrots. Meanwhile, the early risers of chamomile, alliums, peonies, salvia, poppies, irises, lily of the valley and more brighten up the vibrant greenscape. (Thank you, rain!) Garlic, thyme, chives, sage and lavender are also thriving this May.

I have dreamt of a flower stand for a long time while growing flowers for more than 15 years on my little piece of land in Chelsea, Michigan. With very little traffic on my road, this vision has evolved into Cheerful Nature Bouquets. I am offering in-season bouquets of garden flowers and meadow flora in recycled jars. My 4.75 acres are lush with interesting native plants and trees with branches and berries to supplement my garden-grown flowers. In a snap shot, Cheerful Nature Bouquets offers:

  • Ready-to-go bouquets in recycled jars for sale for birthdays, to cheer up a friend, for grad parties, baby showers and other small-scale special events
  • Free bouquets for any Chelsea School District student to cheer up a friend, late May through October
  • Order a bouquet today at (734) 546-2588.

Growing a cutting garden

Flowers bloom from late April through mid-October at my house on about an 1/8th of a collective area. This sounds teeny, yet, it’s a fun smattering of color in various gardens on my 4.75 acres. The first to flower are the Grape Hyacinths and soon to follow are the Alliums, Bleeding Hearts and Irises – rich, burgundy flowering transplants from my mom. The tulips sometimes make it. The bunnies with the edible win again this spring.

My homegrown flowers make me happy — in the garden, at home in eclectic vases and in recycled jars for friends and family. This joy inspired me to launch Cheerful Nature Bouquets — officially today! — and a new hillside cutting garden is underway.

A soil test has been ordered. A Sunday afternoon trek to a favorite grower, Hilltop Greenhouse and Farms, resulted in a carload of perennials and annuals. Another favorite, Salvia, was picked up and more Starlight Coreopsis and a fun new-to-me flower set has been ordered online. Planning is underway with the aid of a borrowed book from my lovely neighbor, Michele: Floret Farm’s Cut Flower Garden. (After much note taking, I had to order the book for my own library.)

Cheerful Nature Bouquets is launched!

Pretty skunk cabbage

I have developed the habit of hiking along the Lowland trail in Waterloo State Park in early spring. So convenient to my home, the trail always delivers on the first distinct signs of spring with the rising of hardy gold-speckled burgundy claws in the wetlands. Oftentimes, I see this skunk cabbage peaking through early-spring snow. A big thanks to the skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus) for the reassurance that spring has truly arrived. Soon, the forest bed will be sprinkled with dainty Trilliums and the outstretched green foliage of the skunk cabbage will be overlooked. Not its smell, though! It is a stinker once its leaves unfurl. Even so, I’m a fan because its a harbinger of spring in the woods and the stinky fragrance attracts certain insect pollinators. Learn more here.